"Trees are poems the earth writes upon the sky,
We fell them down and turn them into paper,
That we may record our emptiness."
Khalil Gibran

Saturday, February 18, 2017

Night Blindness

Astonishment
Alexej von Jawlensky (1919)


I have no head for stars; their numeracy
confounds, but there were once more

when, as a child, I had eyes for the count.
Now I see the moon, a death’s head grin,

Low, blurry around the edges.
Perhaps it is a failing streetlamp.

Or a spaceship, capsized,
and a very long way from home.


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Micro Poetry ~ And the Moon is the Sunday Mini-Challenge in the Imaginary Garden

21 comments:

  1. What an intense close. Really well done, Kerry. Thanks. k.

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  2. My goodness this is good! The image of the moon as death’s head grin is particularly poignant!

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  3. Night once left me calm... love the thought that you once could count the stars...

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  4. a poet's imagination never grows old

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  5. Like a dream you can't quite remember. The night sky does change for us over time.

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  6. "when, as a child, I had eyes for the count"--what an incredibly moving observation!

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  7. Spooky... how both our moons are skeletal. It's the mood of the world, isn't it? Moving from a star-rich sky, to seeing that what one thought to be infinite light might be a tad more sinister.

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  8. Death's head grin.. am going to be reminded of that when I look at the full moon next! Hope I also remember, it is just a failed streetlight!! Love that.

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  9. I love the imagery in this poem, Kerry, and the way you contrast a child's attitude with that of an adult. That 'death’s head grin' is ominous but the failing streetlight and the capsized spaceship a long way from home suggest vulnerability. Beautifully done.

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  10. such a unique and visual way of seeing things Kerry - must be the moonstruck child

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  11. Times change, the world changes, we ourselves change, even when we think all is stasis--but the morphing moon and her palette of stars, despite the shift of shadow, never does. Loved the prompt, and love this.

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  12. Wow. And it really does seem like there were more when we were children, for sure.

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  13. I read this as meaning that you've learned to look without your eyes --- when you close your eyes and stop counting, maybe you feel what is, instead of seeing it, when you allow your imagination to do its job, whether a child or not.

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  14. Life at its best when we were young. Now,
    "Now I see the moon, a death’s head grin,
    Low, blurry around the edges."
    Thank Goodness, it seems age doesn't affect our imagination though. Not yet yours for sure.
    ..

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  15. It's true! Stars always seemed closer to a child. I love the image of the failing streetlamp.

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  16. Great ingress into the reductions of age -- starry sky become lone singular moon -- and perhaps not even that, a streetlight or a stranded spaceship. Agreed that the ending is stellar (lunar?).

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  17. Luv the tension from a child's view to today's view. Yes it's about change but not just change. There's the maturity aspect of it also

    Thanks for dropping by to read mine

    Much love...

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  18. Or a spaceship, capsized,
    and a very long way from home

    More mystifying than what generally has been seen as a nice bright shiny globe!

    Hank

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  19. you have a head in the clouds, or at least toward the sky. which is only appropriate ~

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