"Trees are poems the earth writes upon the sky,
We fell them down and turn them into paper,
That we may record our emptiness."
Khalil Gibran

Thursday, March 30, 2017

Contemplating People ~ Annotated Version

© Kerry O'Connor
(2016)

This poem was written as an intellectual response
to the work of artist, Pablo Picasso, specifically:

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Contemplating people, I have observed 
was recently featured on VerseWrights.

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A reading of the poem is provided below.




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Submitted to the Imaginary Garden with Real Toads
mid-week challenge: Literary Excursions ~ Annotations


26 comments:

  1. I enjoyed the poem and the annotations, Kerry - you have clear writing.

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    1. Thank you, Kim. My writing is often illegible! I'm glad you can make out the words.

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  2. I really enjoyed it too Kerry, and your reading.
    Love how masculinity resolves its headache!
    Kind regards
    Anna :o]

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  3. it won't play for me. I hit play and it changes the screen to "hear more on sound cloud." I X that out and the play button is faded and won't respond. :-(

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    1. Perhaps this link will help.

      https://soundcloud.com/kerry-oconnor/contemplating-people

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  4. So glad that you are reading your poems. It adds so much.

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  5. I'd like to read along, Kerry. Could you maybe (please) copy the poem you are reading into a 'Comment' here. I am not an auditory person. I was glad when the churches started putting the words to the songs on a large screen.
    Thank you, Jim
    ..

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    1. Or, perhaps more professional, might be to add the poem at the bottom of your blog post or provide a link. The comment means would be a no fuss quickie addition.
      Thanks again.
      ..

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    2. Hi Jim, If you click on the picture, it will enlarge or click the link to Verse Wrights where a copy of the poem is available. Thanks.

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  6. Loved the whole idea, from the response to the paintings , the title and to the very end word---Art. From observations to life! I think I have learnt some lessons, how to annotate...something I find hard to do. Beautiful!

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    1. I always embrace an opportunity to learn something that enriches the reading experience.
      Thanks, Sreeja.

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  7. This starts with a really great poem -- one, I assume, that has been in the O'Connor canon for a while, long enough for the author to more fully digest its meanings, enough so to annotate for us everything there is to see. Besides, what poet wouldn't leap at the chance to fully explain their poem to readers? I mean, isn't that the ultimate exegesis, the most naked view of all? All the clues to meaning are offered: Yet I found a certain critique of annotation here --stabs at meaning pale at the ineffable meanings we are left to plumb and grok and distill on our own (if there is such a thing as careful, loyal reading any more). Back to the poem, what a wonderful and vibrant assay on the beds shared by art and heart. "Rise from this bed. This life. Uncovered. Art" -- It's messy, profound, naked and profane. Amen, and thanks for the challenge.

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    1. It felt a bit like my day job, the analysis of my own poem (and I had a few "I see what you did there' moments), but I also gained something of a clinical distance in the process, which I think has been helpful in as much as it allows one to question one's own process in writing (the how, what and why of it).
      Thanks for indulging my belly button staring with so fine a commentary.

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  8. I love the exercise of dissecting your own writing, and to look into your thoughts behind it. All that thought going into the poem and details that show how much you must have worked with the poem... This was a great learning experience for me.

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    1. I felt almost too lazy to do it, Bjorn, but I am pleased that I did. I learned something too.

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  9. Oh I absolutely love this - the lovely reading and the authentic touch which you have given to your poem i.e your handwriting.. such a refreshing read!❤️

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    1. Thank you, Sanaa. I'm sure it becomes obvious that the entire poem would have been impossible without Picasso.
      :-)

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  10. I listened first, and thought the poem was so excellent in itself that I wouldn't like the annotations – but I did, particularly the detailing of the metaphorical. Quite fascinating, in fact.

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    1. I understand the aversion to reading someone else's notes on a poem - one wants to make up one's own mind about interpretation. I am glad my scribbles added something more to your enjoyment of the poem. Thank you.

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  11. you know how much I appreciate your voice.

    and this.

    if I still wrote, i might consider dissection, but then, that's what happens rather than sleep in the wee hours, and besides, i would end up cutting it all out and stare at that blank page, and besides, this annotation reminds me so much of Pound, and if you recall, that was not my most favorite subject at University.

    but the pieces I've read so far have been fantastic. as is this. ~

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    1. But you have just written a prose poem right here with annotations in a very innovative structure, so I'll take it. Thank you very much.

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  12. I love your voice and this excellent and complex poem. Thanks for this look at duality, and a fascinating prompt.

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    1. I'm glad we had fun with it. I want to try again, with a new poem.. perhaps for April.

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Let's talk about it.