"Trees are poems the earth writes upon the sky,
We fell them down and turn them into paper,
That we may record our emptiness."
Khalil Gibran

Sunday, June 25, 2017

Sonnet 38 ~ "I do not want to tell another man"

© Charles Schultz
Fair Use



I do not want to tell another man
I love him, only to see my words ground
to dust over time, while I can taste
them still, fresh as a kiss on my tongue.

To what avail? My belief in words
as a kind of cement has eroded –
every monument to man’s folly
will fall, given time and prevailing winds.

And this is the thing, no words
can warm my feet at night –
not even those I recall spoken
on warmer mornings than frosty June.

I know, hugging oneself to sleep is no substitute
but better than holding on to one who’s already gone.


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Fashion Me Your Words To Fold is hosted by Gillena in The Imaginary Garden.

43 comments:

  1. You pick up the sonnet rhythm smoothly and supply here -- it's a good form for you, it can be carved at a certain distance, which may be the right latitude for cold Junes ... The paradox of solitary comfort is nailed in the final couplet. I'm not sure, but I tend to believe these days that lovers are just stand-ins for the love poems we keep trying to perfect. Accepting that is a blessing -- sure relieves the Beloved of the burden of Keats. But I write that as one who still wakes up next to a spouse. My aches are not graven, my sleep is crowded (there's a smoochy cat involved, too.) The toon is perfect. Linus is a good warning against pining for artists. Great sex, zilch possibility.

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    1. "lovers are just stand-ins for the love poems we keep trying to perfect"

      Beautiful.

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    2. Gah! Couldn't you have given me the advice re artists years ago?

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    3. And the construct of sonnet allows one a never-ending opportunity to deconstruct love and build it up again.

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  2. I can relate to that empty space - and I love the Snoopy illustration..

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  3. I know, hugging oneself to sleep is no substitute
    but better than holding on to one who’s already gone

    The strength of relationship will determine how long the memory will linger on and it is beyond control! Very much so Kerry!

    Hank

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  4. Your take is quite an admirable on. Neither preachy, not presumptuous. And your beautiful sonnet support your chosen Peanuts adequately

    Thanks for participating Kerry

    Much love...

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  5. Ah, indeed sometimes it is better to be happy alone rather than having one's words ground to dust. And, better to accept the reality that it is over rather than hanging on to a dead past.

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    Replies
    1. Reality over dreams... always a tough choice.
      Thanks Mary.

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  6. This is so beautifully tender and eloquent, Kerry!! I dwell in your first stanza.. sigh..

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  7. From beginning to end, your poem is a mine of gut-ripping truths. Goodness, those last lines...

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  8. Amen to that, sister!

    "every monument to man’s folly
    will fall" ... Boy is that the truth.

    Even in marriage, I think a woman has to learn to detach. The kind of love I'm willing to give comes from my hands, not my heart. I'll save that for the rare few who deserve it ... like my mommy, a close girlfriend (if I ever want one).

    From what I can tell, men want touch, ego rubs, and food more than a woman's heart love --- which is fine; they don't want it, they don't get it. There's no reason to serve up something someone doesn't want to eat. I feel like a genius, having learned to eat myself. Lonely, sure. But one day I'll have a friend again, and I'll give her a healed and safe-guarded heart, grow old with her, and die.

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    1. Your response is poetry in itself - so moving.
      Thank you.

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  9. 'hugging oneself to sleep' at least gives a little space to peace...really like how peanuts match with your theme...

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  10. Ah, such a true conclusion. I like the image of the cement of words and every monument to man's folly.

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    1. We love to build monuments, though, don't we?

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  11. I love this poem and the ending is so true.

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  12. I can relate to this poem on like 10000 levels!
    The last 2 lines especially <3

    Love the challenge. Looks super interesting! Will try to contribute.

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    1. Haha! Well, thank goodness for that! My work here is done.

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  13. Wow, this is a wonderful poem, Kerry. Your closing lines hold a great truth we often dont want to see. LOVE the cartoon. Yup, I know how Lucy feels. LOL.

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  14. Ozymandias knew this tune, too. ;-)

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  15. In defense of men, there are those who appreciate the love of a good woman, and return it in like. On the other hand, there's a verdigris frog on my garden wall whom I've dubbed "Frog, Formerly Known as Prince". Good write!

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  16. This is so brilliantly written.....that first stanza utterly stunning with such vivid imagery.

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  17. I love your sonnets.. and this, though painful to read is wonderful... what can I say but continue to write... I think actually words can warm you.

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  18. this is just gorgeous...the fear and the love portrayed.

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  19. This is brilliant. Your sonnet is the perfect juxtaposition for the comic strip shared. The voice is resolute and wistful, without leaning into bitterness.

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  20. Someone whose heart was broken one too many times.

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  21. What a beautiful and sad poem; bed can be such a lonely place...especially with cold feet.

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  22. I can understand getting to this place, but I do want to put in a word for those men who really know how to love well. There are a few around...

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  23. Yes, bare all & what if the future throws it back in your face, making it sting the more on a frosty tear stained face... but then... don't let one spoil the future for others... one should not have that power - love x

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  24. This was a pleasure to read. Your voice sad and real . . . it truly made me feel. It is true, finding a good partner, be it man or woman can be very difficult. To do so, I decided that I had to grow up. This was many years ago - it worked. Thank you.

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  25. Wow, your closing cuplet, such sound advice. Think most have been there. I really did enjoy this peice of poetry.

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  26. Great , thought provoking , poem.Yes it is sad when your love and all your giving seems wasted but imagine what it is like to be inside of a taker....shudder! They are never happy so keep on loving and giving...you are rewarded in so many many ways. Love this poem !

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  27. it's so - satisfying - to read this, smoothly hewn, cavern deep, etched as water on granite walls, having us feel the cool depths while remembering the light above that once lit us. love is as much memory as forgiveness - or perhaps that's what I hope, since I have the one, but not the other. ~

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    1. Thanks, M, though I'm not sure I can own to the granite.. perhaps a scribble in the dust.
      Your last sentence has given me much to ponder in its beautiful phrasing.

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  28. Oh, doesn't that particular cartoon just nail it! And the sonnet's perfect; every word and nuance essential. (My husband didn't run out of love, but of life; the effect is much the same.)

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