"Trees are poems the earth writes upon the sky,
We fell them down and turn them into paper,
That we may record our emptiness."
Khalil Gibran

Sunday, July 23, 2017

The Resting Place

The end of choice, the last of hope; and all
Here to confess that something has gone wrong.
Philip Larkin


Iosias Sepultus in Mausoleum Patrum
Salvador Dali


It begins with a death. Preferably in the 15th century but any year will do. Even this year of our Lord. Cue a train of mourners – two abreast – they have apparelled themselves in momentary grief and clutch, perhaps, a symbolic rose apiece. For props, two stone angels leering from twin alcoves – inexplicably one wears a sly grin. Naturally, the overcast sky provides pathetic fallacy. An oaken door, bulleted with iron rivets, on a creaky hinge. Double doors would be better. They swing inward and this is where you come in. No expense was spared for your conveyance – four onyx horses wearing plumes or a long automobile in muted black. Bystanders cross themselves. Six men of equal height bear the palled form of what once was you. This is your room now, behind the barricade. The living step back, take a bow. A scattering of petals they have cast aside on the marble stairs is the only reminder of blood in the entire scene. 

Are you nearby, waiting for me in the wings? 


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The Weekend Mini-Challenge in the Imaginary Garden is hosted by Kim, who has provided us with Philip Larkin's poem, The Building, as inspiration.

Shared at Poetry Pantry # 363.


26 comments:

  1. A complex and thought provoking write - I loved every syllable

    ReplyDelete
  2. The showtime and concern at a funeral is but a mask of the life that has been taken. Even tears can be but an act whilst the genuine mourners remain silent. What a great scene you have painted here Kerry.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Oh that overcast sky providing pathetic fallacy...! Wonderfully written.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Wow, Kerry, that's different! And I love the Dali image. I love the way you have interwoven the details of the building with the mourners:
    the 'two stone angels leering from twin alcoves'; the 'oaken door, bulleted with iron rivets, on a creaky hinge'; and the marble steps.
    I also love the way you portray the corpse as the lead in a play.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Your closing line, an internal question that must be asked so many times.
    For props, two stone angels leering from twin alcoves – inexplicably one wears a sly grin...........well I can see them in my minds eye... I really did enjoy reading your piece.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Whew, this is chilling, Kerry. I was drawn into the timeless scene wonderfully drawn... I like the mention of both the onyx horses and the black automobile, symbolic of this timelessness and a fate all will meet...though for now we 'wait in the wings.'

    ReplyDelete
  7. I'm on a journey this morning, having read this right after Thotpurge's Dying Alone. You cast a scene from a life movie. Regal with a touch of Vincent Price horror. The last line offers hope.

    ReplyDelete
  8. An intriguing and delightful read indeed, good of you to share.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I love the horses, the plumes, the pageantry, all to mask the loss of someone's life. Beautifully done, Kerry.

    ReplyDelete
  10. this seems a "last" and beautiful story well told. The words you have chosen are beautiful indeed! "Death" is a perfect place to begin a magic tale!

    ReplyDelete
  11. What a scene you have painted with your words....so vivid I can see it and feel it!

    Donna@LivingFromHappiness

    ReplyDelete
  12. The overcast sky that provides pathetic fallacy is so powerful! Beautifully penned, Kerry!

    ReplyDelete
  13. Chilling but compelling. I was captured especially by the term "onyx horses". (I'm going now to queue up some happy music).

    ReplyDelete
  14. The image of those angels reminds me of the two that sit at the door of the national cemetery. There is a slightly sinister glint in their stone eyes, as if they know something terrible--enjoy knowing it--and they know it will happen to the person currently looking at them.

    ReplyDelete
  15. What a startling opening: 'It begins with a death'. A startling finish, too. And in between, such gorgeous and simultaneously chilling detail. Most intriguing ... and yes, I bet the spirit is nearby, waiting.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Oooooo, how delightful in its macabre matter-of-fact description. Super ending as well. Love it!!

    ReplyDelete
  17. I like that you make the corpse the star. My mother always referred to it as being "the huge round of roast beef on the buffet". When she died back in June, I made damn sure she wasn't put on display. I love the angels - especially the one with the sly grin.

    ReplyDelete
  18. "This is your room now" The staging and theatrical devices are splendid, making the possibility of waiting imaginable!

    ReplyDelete
  19. Beautiful piece. Wonderful ending.

    ReplyDelete
  20. This was very well composed. It really draws one in. But you knew how brilliantly you were doing, for you ended with a reality check: "Are you nearby, waiting for me in the wings?"

    ReplyDelete
  21. An eerie writing, Kerry. You did well. The image is also scary, I didn't know Dali painted such as this.
    ..

    ReplyDelete
  22. Luv this interlude of light in the scary write
    "Naturally, the overcast sky provides pathetic fallacy."

    much love...

    ReplyDelete
  23. This is somber and beautifully vivid.

    ReplyDelete
  24. I don't think I want a funeral. Let me pace into eternity without any noise. Memories are short..Why try to fill them with air you can't hold on to? So beautifully poignant..

    ReplyDelete
  25. admire the voice in this. a sort of wry Vincent Price, in my imagination ~

    ReplyDelete

Let's talk about it.